Tagged with british films

The Shape of a Career: Sally Hawkins

The Shape of a Career: Sally Hawkins


Those of you who know me have probably picked up on my enthusiasm for literally everything Sally Hawkins does, even things she does in movies that aren’t particularly good (though it’s rare she shows up in movies that aren’t particularly good, excepting Godzilla). So, because I love Hawkins so gosh-darn much, I went deep on the … Continue reading

Review: The Party, 2018, dir. Sally Potter

Review: The Party, 2018, dir. Sally Potter


Sally Potter is the typical female auteur in that she is often underappreciated in comparison to her male peers. I happen to think that this is a big dumb failing of movie culture; Potter is superb, at drawing characters, at evoking a sense of time and place in her movies, at constructing sharp-ass dialogue for … Continue reading

Review: Prevenge, 2017, dir. Alice Lowe

Review: Prevenge, 2017, dir. Alice Lowe


“A 7 months pregnant woman starts murdering the people involved in her partner’s death because her unborn baby tells her to.” That’s Prevenge in summation. In my mind, there’s an alternate dimension where the film attached to that summation is just a winking, nudging, overly self-aware video nasty, and it’s probably fun but too insistent on … Continue reading

Review: Dough, 2016, dir. John Goldschmidt

Review: Dough, 2016, dir. John Goldschmidt


I wouldn’t say I disliked John Goldschmidt’s Dough, though I’m not sure I liked it as a whole movie, either. If I have any pet peeves with movies, and I have many pet peeves with movies, so let’s just pretend I have one, and if I have one pet peeve with movies, it’s when they jam too many different … Continue reading

Review: 45 Years, 2015, dir. Andrew Haigh

Review: 45 Years, 2015, dir. Andrew Haigh


“The word “infidelity” likely conjures very specific images in the minds of most; a young couple entangled in a forbidden tryst, lonesome spouses finding succor in the arms of another person, egotists two-timing their partners in hotels for the sheer thrill of it. But we’re just as capable of emotional betrayals as carnal liaisons, of … Continue reading

Review: The Riot Club, 2015, dir. Lone Scherfig

Review: The Riot Club, 2015, dir. Lone Scherfig


“Lone Scherfig’s new film name-drops its own title so many times that it very nearly verges on self-parody. If a tenacious viewer felt so inclined, they could make a super-cut of every time anybody on screen coyly huffs and puffs about the eponymous ultra-exclusive “riot club,” and it might last several minutes; the club, a private, … Continue reading

Review: Queen and Country, 2015, dir. John Boorman

Review: Queen and Country, 2015, dir. John Boorman


“You don’t need to watch John Boorman’s 1987 comedy drama Hope and Glory to vibe with its sequel, the decades-in-the-making Queen and Country. That’s probably the greatest feat Boorman pulls off with this follow-up to his unassuming Oscar nominee: walk into the film blind, and short of feeling like you’re up the Thames without a … Continue reading

Review: Pride, 2014, dir. Matthew Warchus

Review: Pride, 2014, dir. Matthew Warchus


“From its first frames, Pride opens itself wide to scrutiny: this is based on a true story. We’re used to this, of course. We turn to the cinema for escape, but by invoking REALITY the so-called “true story” breaks the illusion we’ve sought, and in turn, we feel it’s our obligation to call the veracity … Continue reading

Review: In the Loop, 2009, dir. Armando Iannucci

Review: In the Loop, 2009, dir. Armando Iannucci


If one word describes In the Loop, Armando Iannucci’s 2009 political satire, it’s almost certainly “scathing”. If two, that and “unforgiving”. Going further would only yield an entire novella of words meant to convey intense discontent or outright anger, and indeed the only declarative statement I can make about the film in the positive is … Continue reading

Review: Fish Tank, 2009, dir. Andrea Arnold

Review: Fish Tank, 2009, dir. Andrea Arnold


While I doubt most of us can claim to come from the same circumstances as Mia, the rough-around-the-edges protagonist of Andrea Arnold’s 2009 coming-of-age film Fish Tank, I’m sure most of us can at least empathize on a spiritual or philosophical level with her eventual need to reach for something better in her life. That … Continue reading