Matches for: “ari aster” …

Spider-Man: Homeroom

Spider-Man: Homeroom


It’s bad enough we have to learn about superheroes in movie theaters all across the world these days, but now our children have to learn about superheroes in the classroom. Someone, please: Think of the children. There’s a lot that happens in <i>Spider-Man: Homecoming</i>, most of it designed to bolster the bonds holding the Marvel … Continue reading

The 100 Best Movies of the 1950s

The 100 Best Movies of the 1950s


Next up in Paste Magazine’s “100 Best/Greatest” series: The 1950s! I blurbed my ass off for this list, and I’d do it again in a heartbeat (which is to say that I am literally doing it again right now, for a different list focused on a different subject. As Hexxus once said: No breaks!). Anywho … Continue reading

Review: Hardcore Henry, 2016, dir. Ilya Naishuller

Review: Hardcore Henry, 2016, dir. Ilya Naishuller


I have never gotten motion sick from watching a movie. Ever. My stomach stayed strong through the shaky-cam antics of Cloverfield, and I didn’t flinch watching either of the first two V/H/S films in the theater. (V/H/S Viral upset my digestion, but only because it’s kind of a terrible movie.) I can endure buckets of gore without batting … Continue reading

Stay Frosty Oscars: My Half-Assed Academy Awards Predictions

Stay Frosty Oscars: My Half-Assed Academy Awards Predictions


Fair warning: I really didn’t want to write this piece, and I’m doing it out of misguided obligation. Maybe I’m whining, but cut me some slack; I’ve already written about the #OscarsSoWhite fracas, and also contributed a handful of yadda yaddas to Paste Magazine’s annual Oscar preview (though I spend most of my yaddas turning my nose up at the … Continue reading

Review: The Witch, 2016, dir. Robert Eggers

Review: The Witch, 2016, dir. Robert Eggers


There’s not a lot that I have to say about Roger Eggers’ The Witch that isn’t perfectly encapsulated by a single line from Drew McWeeny’s review out of Sundance 2015. “I’m not sure how you explain what you want in scenes like these to kids,” he wrote of one specific and electrifying moment midway through the … Continue reading

Review: Hail, Caesar!, 2016, dir. Joel & Ethan Coen

Review: Hail, Caesar!, 2016, dir. Joel & Ethan Coen


Let’s get one thing outta the way: Hail, Caesar! is minor Coen brothers. It is not No Country For Old Men, though if we are using that as the yardstick separate “minor” Coens from “major” Coens, then nearly every film they have made since 2007 falls into the former category. You can instead lump Hail, Caesar! in with A Serious … Continue reading

Review: The Finest Hours, 2016, dir. Craig Gillespie

Review: The Finest Hours, 2016, dir. Craig Gillespie


  For me, watching The Finest Hours reinforced the necessity for watching movies before interviewing the talent involved in their production. Grant that this is very much an irregular practice for me, and that nobody on a set visit has seen the movie beforehand for obvious reasons. All the same, it was only inevitable that my … Continue reading

Whites, Camera, Action

Whites, Camera, Action


It is pretty to think that all of this year’s Oscars outrage might have been avoided with just a few shifts in nominations. In truth, recognition for some combination of Samuel L. Jackson, Will Smith, Teyonah Parris, Ryan Coogler, Michael B. Jordan, Jason Mitchell, Corey Hawkins, Jada Pinkett Smith, Abraham Attah, Idris Elba, Mya Taylor, Aaron Covington, … Continue reading

Interview: Ben Foster, The Finest Hours

Interview: Ben Foster, The Finest Hours


“For an actor spending their days getting tossed around a gimbal while waves of frigid water smack them in the face, a few minutes’ reprieve in a nice, warm press tent sounds like heaven. But when a waterlogged and exhausted Ben Foster (Warcraft) met with Screen Rant and other journalists on the set of Craig Gillespie’s upcoming … Continue reading

Best of Criterion’s New Releases, December 2015

Best of Criterion’s New Releases, December 2015


“Fair warning: You may want to precede your first viewing of Japanese artist-filmmaker crossover wunderkind Takashi Murakami’s Jellyfish Eyes by reading the essay Glen Helfand has penned for Criterion’s Blu-ray release. If you like to walk on the wild side, go right ahead, check out the movie before Helfand, but you’re just increasing the odds that … Continue reading

Review: Breathe, 2015, dir. Mélanie Laurent

Review: Breathe, 2015, dir. Mélanie Laurent


“Nothing’s more effective at shaking a teen out of their monotonous high school routine than the arrival of a new student. That’s the stuff actress/director Mélanie Laurent’s sophomore film, Breathe, is made of: mystery and allure, with generous dollops of adolescent rivalry, sexual awakening and verbal abuse spooned on top. Think of Breatheas a distant … Continue reading

Review: Fant4stic, 2015, dir. Josh Trank

Review: Fant4stic, 2015, dir. Josh Trank


“If at first you don’t succeed, try and try again.” When W.E. Hickson popularized this crusty old Thomas Palmer aphorism back in the 1800’s, he couldn’t have known that one day, one of America’s most high profile movie studios would take the phrase to heart with not one, not two, but three attempts at building a franchise … Continue reading

Review: Amira & Sam, 2015, dir. Sean Mullin

Review: Amira & Sam, 2015, dir. Sean Mullin


“Well, here’s a thoroughly unexpected concept for a movie: a romantic comedy cast in the shadow of America’s involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan. On paper, Sean Mullin’s Amira & Sam sounds like a dicey prospect, but in practice, the marriage between its lighthearted mode and the United States’ contentious overseas campaigns works beautifully. Mullin’s film … Continue reading

Review: 12 Years a Slave, 2013, dir. Steve McQueen

Review: 12 Years a Slave, 2013, dir. Steve McQueen


In a two hour movie brimming with finely calibrated, impeccably composed images that capture the brutal realities of America’s antebellum slave culture, a single shot of our nation’s looming capitol proves the most provocative. 12 Years a Slave, for all of its remarkable qualities, should be identified most of all as the rare movie that … Continue reading